Ask The Doc! Ascites And Spindle Cell Sarcoma

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ask the doc

This week, the Doctors discuss Ascites in a patient whose lung Cancer is being treated by the Jimmy Carter Immune Therapy. What is it? How is it treated? They also touch on the Spindle Cell Sarcoma. How serious is it? What are the different kinds of Sarcomas? The doctors also give a brief Covid update.

 

News for anti-enforcement Metro-Atlanta Sheriffs: Georgia law requires all jailers to report incarcerated illegal aliens to DHS

Opinion

Governor Brian Kemp remains silent on illegal immigration

Written and submitted By D.A. King

In 2011, Aurelio Mayo Perez, an illegal alien, was booked into the Cobb County jail for no driver’s license but released due to an immigration enforcement reduction edict from then-President Barack Obama. Two years later, Mayo Perez was charged with aggravated child molestation and rape. The name of the ten-year old girl he was convicted of repeatedly molesting is not available.

Last week, newly sworn Cobb County Sheriff Craig Owens held an elaborate press conference packed with invited anti-enforcement activists and proudly announced his termination of the 287(g) program. The Marietta Daily Journal described the event’s big finish with “…as the event ended, and a mariachi band began to play, the mood in the room was decidedly celebratory. The new sheriff even took to the floor and waltzed for a moment, reveling in his audience’s approval.”  Cobb County Deputy Sheriff Loren Lilly – killed in a 2007 traffic crash by an unlicensed illegal alien driver – was unable to attend.  

Democrat Commission Chairwoman Lisa Cupid pronounced Owens’ decision “bold, necessary, and overdue.” Cobb’s new District Attorney, Flynn Broady weighed in with “this is going to make our community safer.” We recommend reading the entire MDJ report

Created by Congress in 1996, and signed into law by Bill Clinton, the voluntary 287(g) program is a tool used to expand the authority of local law enforcement to locate and report to ICE illegal aliens, usually in county jails. It’s a deterrent. Then-Senator Joe Biden voted in favor of passage. 

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports Owens claims “the program morphed into one that profiled immigrants through traffic stops, which resulted in them being deported on misdemeanor charges.” While Sheriff Owens – a former Cobb County policeman – is certainly free to smear his fellow law enforcement officers with shameless accusations of profiling, he should understand that it’s illegal aliens who are deported and that removal is the punishment for illegal immigration, not traffic violations. 

Jose Alfaro-Contraras, an illegal alien from El Salvador, was one of the gunmen in an April, 2015 armed robbery of the owner of a check-cashing store in Duluth. A year earlier, Alfaro-Contraras had been in the Gwinnett County jail on a shoplifting charge. He was released because “minor crime.”

The above examples are taken from a 2017 report “Jail records reveal immigrants not deported after minor crimes later commit worse ones” from Atlanta’s Fox Five TV News investigative reporter Randy Travis. 

(L) -Cobb Co. Sheriff Craig Owens, (R) -Gwinnett County Sheriff Keybo Taylor Photo credit: WSB-TV/Twitter

In Gwinnett County, on his first day in office, Sheriff Keybo Taylor made his enforcement policy clear when he quit the 287(g) program: “What we will not be doing is notifying ICE of anybody’s immigration status in the jail or any of our facilities…” said Taylor at his own presser. He told a local NPR interviewer 287(g) is slanted towards “people of color.” 

“So basically, what that program started to do was target, uh, you know, people of color that were in this country that’s undocumented, so, you know, it became, you know, a racist issue for me…”, 

Taylor says he would rather focus on gang members. I was curious, so I checked with experts on gangs in Gwinnett and the skin color concern Taylor expressed. But on that topic Sheriff Taylor does have worries about borders “…crime and criminals…they don’t, they do not respect borders, so, you know, it’s nothing to come from Atlanta to Gwinnett County…” says Taylor. Indeed.

 

In print and radio interviews, both sheriffs have done a remarkable job of learning and adhering to the anti-287(g) talking points distributed by the far-left. Below are some of those tips from a 2008 ACLU ‘toolkit.’ 

 

‘How to oppose 287(g) agreements in your state or locality’

 

* Always describe how police enforcement of immigration laws endangers public safety for everyone.

* Assert that local police of immigration laws will result in widespread racial profiling.

* Assert that immigration enforcement is the responsibility of the federal government.

* Assert that police resources are stretched thin already.

 

Georgia law: A ‘Plan B’ to address anti-enforcement sheriffs

Attention Georgia prosecutors, including Flynn Broady in Cobb County: Independent of 287(g), longstanding (2006) state law (OCGA 42-4-14) requires jailers to check the immigration status of incoming foreign prisoners. “If the foreign national is determined to be an illegal alien, the keeper of the jail or other officer shall notify the United States Department of Homeland Security, or other office or agency designated for notification by the federal government.” 

This “Plan B” would be much more effective if it is actually enforced and if Gov. Kemp would end his silence on illegal immigration. See the Dustin Inman Society Brian Kemp file here.

D.A. King is president of the non-profit, Georgia-based Dustin Inman Society.

New Data Supports Social Distancing Now More Than Ever

Featured, Health, News
Department of public health

News Release from the Department of Public Health – April 2, 2020

Atlanta – As Governor Brian Kemp and DPH Commissioner Kathleen E. Toomey, M.D.,
M.P.H., finalize the details of the Executive Order requiring Georgians to shelter in place, it is
important to emphasize why these measures are needed now to keep all Georgians healthy and
safe and to stop the spread of COVID-19.

For weeks it has been known that people who were positive for COVID-19 but did not have
symptoms likely were able to transmit the virus. However, on March 30, Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention (CDC) Director Robert Redfield, M.D., confirmed that new data indicates
that as many as 25% of individuals infected with COVID-19 remain asymptomatic. Additionally,
science also now informs us that individuals who are symptomatic, are infectious up to 48
hours before symptoms appear. This new information tells the health care community,
medical researchers, public health and governments why COVID-19 is spreading so rapidly.
“Until now, containing the spread of COVID-19 has been based on early detection and isolation
of people with symptoms of the virus,” said Toomey. “Social distancing and keeping people
apart from each other are now more than just recommendations; they are the best weapons we
have to stop the spread of COVID-19.”

In addition to social distancing, all Georgians are reminded to wash their hands frequently and
thoroughly with soap and water, or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer (60% alcohol) when
soap and water aren’t available. Avoid touching your face, nose, mouth, and eyes with
unwashed hands. Cover your coughs and sneezes with a tissue, and throw the used tissue in
the trash.

To read more about the presymptomatic transmission of COVID-19:
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/hcp/clinical-guidance-management-patients.html
https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6914e1.htm?s_cid=mm6914e1_w
For more information about COVID-19 https://dph.georgia.gov/novelcoronavirus or
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html.

For updates on the COVID-19 situation as it develops, follow @GaDPH, @GeorgiaEMA, and
@GovKemp on Twitter and @GaDPH, @GEMA.OHS, and @GovKemp on Facebook.

Volunteer for COVID-19 Response

Featured, Health

Volunteer for COVID-19 Response

Atlanta – The Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH) is receiving offers from medical
professionals and other individuals looking for ways to help with the COVID-19 response. An
effective response relies on volunteers who are pre-credentialed and organized. Georgia
Responds is Georgia’s health and medical volunteer program which matches the skills and
credentials of medical and nonmedical volunteers to help stop the spread of COVID-19 in
Georgia.

Medical volunteers may be used to answer medical questions coming into the COVID-19
hotline, or assist at test specimen collection sites. Nonmedical volunteers may be used in
administrative roles at either the call-center or test collection sites, or provide interpretation or
other skills as needed.

To volunteer, log on to https://dph.georgia.gov/georgia-responds and click on the “Register
Now” box. Registering only takes a few minutes. Prospective volunteers will be asked for their
name, address, contact information and occupation type. In order to be eligible for some
assignments, responders are encouraged to complete a profile summary, which includes skills
and certifications, training, medical history, emergency contact and deployment preferences
Once your skills and credentials are reviewed, you will be notified by a DPH representative.
All Georgians play a critical role in helping to slow the spread of COVID-19 by adhering
to the following guidance:

• Practice social distancing by putting at least 6 feet between yourself and other people.
• Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
• Stay home if you are sick.
• Wash your hands frequently and thoroughly with soap and water.
• Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available.
• Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
• Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.

For updates on the COVID-19 situation as it develops, follow @GaDPH, @GeorgiaEMA, and
@GovKemp on Twitter and @GaDPH, @GEMA.OHS, and @GovKemp on Facebook.
For information about COVID-19, visit https://dph.georgia.gov/novelcoronavirus or
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html.

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